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The Fender Deluxe Reverb - the G.O.A.T?

charliechitlins

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As a matter of fact, old electrolytic capacitors DO leak and ooze a physical substance (in addition to let pass electrical current). Le liquid electrolite inside dries with age , taking more space. It then beggins to push through the safety hole under the sealing rubbery seal at the positive side of the cap, causing a bubble, which finally blows up, letting a (often whitish, but not allways) powder to come out.
This is certainly true.
But they can start "leaking" DC long before they start leaking goo.
They always start leaking DC.
They sometimes ooze.
My point was to possibly save someone some heartbreak by teaching them that there is no reliable visual check for caps.
 

LeonC

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Aug 30, 2002
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Totally agree with his description of the sound of a late 60s Les Paul Custom. That was my main guitar for years. I always felt that the ebony fb results in a response not unlike maple. Less midrange that rosewood, a bit more of everything else. It varies from piece to piece of course...but generally...
 

bern1

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50 years on from when I started buying used tube amps now. For sure any vintage amp that has not been serviced will need to be gone through. Kind of like vintage mechanical watches or fountain pens. As said, the basics are not rocket science but pay money to somebody who knows if you don’t
 

Wilko

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Totally agree with his description of the sound of a late 60s Les Paul Custom. That was my main guitar for years. I always felt that the ebony fb results in a response not unlike maple. Less midrange that rosewood, a bit more of everything else. It varies from piece to piece of course...but generally...
No Les Paus have mahogany fretboards. ANd if he wants that sharp articulation, the nylon saddles aren't going give the clarity of brass
 

LeonC

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No Les Paus have mahogany fretboards. ANd if he wants that sharp articulation, the nylon saddles aren't going give the clarity of brass
Did someone say Les Pauls have mahogany fretboards?

Having just switched back and forth (on my 1965 ES335) between the original bridge with nylon saddles and the original bridge from my '61 335 with nickel-plated brass saddles, to me, the difference--on this guitar--somewhat surprisingly, is almost imperceptible. I'd expect the sonic differences to vary a bit from guitar to guitar.
 

LeonC

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Leakin DC would be a good band name.
Ha! Hey I saw that someone appears to be making replicas of the old Astron caps...the yellow signal caps and the brown-paper electrolytic. Popped up in my FB feed. I don't doubt there's a market...but the irony is those were never known for their longevity. It's cool to see them (originals) in an old amp...but you know they're all going to be leaking DC by now...
 

Wilko

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Did someone say Les Pauls have mahogany fretboards?

Having just switched back and forth (on my 1965 ES335) between the original bridge with nylon saddles and the original bridge from my '61 335 with nickel-plated brass saddles, to me, the difference--on this guitar--somewhat surprisingly, is almost imperceptible. I'd expect the sonic differences to vary a bit from guitar to guitar.
the guy in that video. twice.
 

LeonC

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the guy in that video. twice.
Wow...missed that, but I didn't watch all of it. I've seen some of his videos before. My impression was, he's been around and knows his gear pretty well. Maybe just a brain fart?
 

MBSC

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Oct 31, 2023
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I have to say divide amps into wattage categories. Under 22 and over 22..Vibrolux, SR and Supers reign over 22 but the BFDR is the best of all time at 22 or less...BUT wasn't the Clapton bluesbreaker amp 18 watts?
 

Wilko

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I have to say divide amps into wattage categories. Under 22 and over 22..Vibrolux, SR and Supers reign over 22 but the BFDR is the best of all time at 22 or less...BUT wasn't the Clapton bluesbreaker amp 18 watts?
no. Clapton's was, from what most can gather, a JTM45 model 1962. Big tubes.
 
Last edited:

Xpensive Wino

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Nov 3, 2012
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Did someone say Les Pauls have mahogany fretboards?

Having just switched back and forth (on my 1965 ES335) between the original bridge with nylon saddles and the original bridge from my '61 335 with nickel-plated brass saddles, to me, the difference--on this guitar--somewhat surprisingly, is almost imperceptible. I'd expect the sonic differences to vary a bit from guitar to guitar.
Clapton's '64 335 had nylon saddles. Sounded fine to me. So did the one I owned.
 

charliechitlins

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Nov 16, 2021
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Did someone say Les Pauls have mahogany fretboards?

Having just switched back and forth (on my 1965 ES335) between the original bridge with nylon saddles and the original bridge from my '61 335 with nickel-plated brass saddles, to me, the difference--on this guitar--somewhat surprisingly, is almost imperceptible. I'd expect the sonic differences to vary a bit from guitar to guitar.
The assumption is that a metal will necessarily have a brighter sound than something like nylon or wood.
It ain't necessarily so.
I have swapped out tune-o-matics for rosewoood and got more zing/brightness.
There are definitely rules...the questionable part is: Who makes them?
What you think is just simple physics, may just be intuition. There are way too many variables at play to simply say, "This material will do this."
The only thing that is absolutely for sure is, you need to experiment and use your ears.
 

bern1

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Nov 23, 2004
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I've had nylon, brass and Tusq saddles on my 335. Back and forth a few times. I tried, but really couldn't tell the difference. Then again, my hearing is definitely not what it used to be.
 

Xpensive Wino

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I've had nylon, brass and Tusq saddles on my 335. Back and forth a few times. I tried, but really couldn't tell the difference. Then again, my hearing is definitely not what it used to be.
I wonder how many people "listen" with their eyes.
 
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