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Using the Mixolydian on the V Chord

Standard Magic

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Mar 31, 2019
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I've been practicing some 12 bar blues off youtube, noticed in some examples that the mixolydian scale gets used on the V chord and even leading up to it. Is there a rule for this? As to when/where to use the major third/mixolydian scale? (I'm aware that blues scales can use chord tones therefore the major third).

In a typical blues progression, does the mixolydian scale get used more in the V chord? The IV chord?
 

charliechitlins

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Nov 16, 2021
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I didn't know thats what it was called, but...yeah.
To me, it gives a "major" sound often associated with BB.
I like it over the I and V, and a minor pentatonic over the IV.
I also sometimes use the pentatonic scale for the I chord on the V.
I just realized I don't know how to explain that.
In an A Blues, on the V chord, use the E minor pentatonics.
Poor man's arpeggio.
 

corpse

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Jun 9, 2007
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But it takes all the "primitive" out of it. Makes it modern sounding like Robben Ford.
I have to dig out all my mode notes- it is a effing rabbit hole...
Hungarian Lydian flat seventh... Judas Priest...
I tried something Charlie to mess with your morning coffee- draw out in magic marker a Blues box and then overlay a clear acetate- then just pop in the two tones that make a particular mode special.
It's what the y might call a hack but a cool one- esp for me when I forget so easily.
 

MarcB

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I believe it’s the rudimentary functionality of all music. As much as there is no 1-2-3-4 count.. only 1.
 

MarcB

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Excuse my ignorance but what does this mean exactly?
This is just a different perspective on modes etc.. as you don’t have to stick to a musical formula.. these are foundations on which to build off or on musically. Which translates as .. you can play what ever notes you want .. even if the notes are not in the scale.. as long as the final note played is in the scale.. (and not necessarily the root note, but this certainly helps)

“without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible” - Frank Zappa
 
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charliechitlins

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This is just a different perspective on modes etc.. as you don’t have to stick to a musical formula.. these are foundations on which to build off or on musically. Which translates as .. you can play what ever notes you want .. even if the notes are not in the scale.. as long as the final note played is in the scale.. (and not necessarily the root note, but this certainly helps)

“without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible” - Frank Zappa
Even in the context of a straight Blues, I sometimes play a repeating geometric pattern like 2 adjacent frets going across 4 or5 strings and resolving to a "correct" note, like the tonic.
I used to do it without even thinking about it because I learned totally by ear.
One day a fellow player asked me, How do you play out like that? And I had to think about it.
 

fakejake

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Mixolydian doesn't really sound 'modern'. It is about as vanilla as you can play over a V chord. Still, you can use it on all 3 dominat 7 chords in a regular blues form.
So on a blues in E, you play E Mixolydian (same notes as the B Major or Ionian Scale) over the E7, A Mixolydian (same notes as the E Major or Ionian Scale) over the A7, and B Mixolydian (same notes as the F# Major or Ionian Scale) over the B7 chords.
If you want a more 'modern' sound, try the diminished or altered scales. Robben Ford talks about them in several videos, Jazz players have used them for the past 80 or so years.
 

corpse

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Everything can be a passing tone. Just resolve to something “right”. It can be called creating tension. It can be called a lot of things.
I heard something interesting from the former guitarist from the Voice. For minor go down one fret- for major up one. I have tried it. It got looks. I m not terribly brave and bravery is a key factor here.
 

MarcB

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" I learned totally by ear.
My opinion is playing by ear is a major benefit and is the only way to progress .. as you’re not bound by the rules and conventions of music.
I know so many musicians that can’t go beyond the standards because they’re shackled by the standards (and as @corspe rightly said..)
bravery is a key factor here.

Do what sounds right to you.. that’s it.
Hendrix and Page are a testament to that theory.
 

latetothegame

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Aug 1, 2015
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Sorry in advance for my ignorance. Aren't I (ionian) and V (mixolydian) relative scales (share the same notes)? Could that be the reason?
 

Any Name You Wish

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Apr 15, 2021
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A long time ago I got bored with the Pentatonic scales and also noticed that my guitar heroes did hit some interesting notes not of the scale (BB King and Freddie King were masters and the British guys picked it up and ran with it brilliantly). Playing a vinyl record and lifting the needle off and putting it back down in the track a million times trying to figure out "wtf is he doing there." I still do this with CD's occasionally, but now we have YouTube to short cut the process.

I think this guy does a good job of explaining how to mix the Mixolydian scale into Pentatonic major and minor blues, and he also plays some examples. He's quite good. Knowing theory-wise where these notes go is great, but you still have to play blues from the heart, so practice, practice, practice until it just flows out of you....

 
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