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Nice Pic of Clapton w/ a Firebird

rabbit

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Apr 24, 2005
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That Firebird i think is all over Creams last record. And it sounds so f-cking great.
It seams to have less sustain that the Custom Lp and Summers Lp but instead it snarls like a rabbid dog in Claptons hand and really is freaking awseome.

Anybody know what happended to it ?
And are the new Furebird 5 USA modell any good?

Clapton donated his Firebird I to a celebrity auction in London in the '80s, where it was sold to raise funds for a worthy cause. The last I knew, the guy who presently owns it lives in Germany, where he bought it from a Hard Rock Cafe there. For pics, visit the Gibson Firebird Owners website.
 
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MWR

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ClaptonsFirebirdILargePic.jpg


This one is just awesome......o where, o where did the real rock scene go....o where, o where can it be? :jim
 

guitarchitecture

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the gear is cool- but the music has been truly amazing-
imho
by far our most important guitarist- the range of expression and brilliant innovation has been staggering from Eric's early days on-
(just sayin')
His solo on Sleepy Time from Live Cream with that Firebird is staggering- incredible grace and tone.
 
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mistersnappy

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Interesting pics. I see him playing it on what looks like the Spring of '68 Tour. :hmm
 

JRW8214@AOL.COM

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Actually chuck thats from a tv show that him and a bunch of other musicians appeared on called Supershow. That last one i mean
 

goldtop0

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Actually chuck thats from a tv show that him and a bunch of other musicians appeared on called Supershow. That last one i mean


EC had a bit of a playout(lick for lick) with Buddy Guy on that..........hmm Buddy sounded good and EC's tone was thin and crappy unfortunately.
So 1970 he moved to a strat...............as we know!!
 

JRW8214@AOL.COM

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EC had a bit of a playout(lick for lick) with Buddy Guy on that..........hmm Buddy sounded good and EC's tone was thin and crappy unfortunately.
So 1970 he moved to a strat...............as we know!!

yeah i have it on dvd. too bad the performances are all butchered up with the editing
 

rabbit

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EC had a bit of a playout(lick for lick) with Buddy Guy on that..........hmm Buddy sounded good and EC's tone was thin and crappy unfortunately.
So 1970 he moved to a strat...............as we know!!

Since Clapton was playing through a 100 watt Marshall stack, he obviously backed way off on his volume to keep from drowning out Buddy on that jam; hence the thin tone. It's sort of the same situation that Eric found himself in on the famous live Cream performance of "Sunshine Of Your Love" on The Glen Campbell Goodtimes Hour in 1968. Due to the limited technical capabilities of television at that time ( or maybe simply that the director didn't want to fool with the hassle of balancing the roar of the Marshall stacks, ) Eric was forced to play at a very low volume with the expected results --- virtually no distortion or sustain. He was playing the 'Bird that time also. Make no mistake, though. When he playing the Firebird I at full volume as he normally did at concerts, he got a great, great sound out of it. As he later said in an interview, that one pickup had a "fantastic" sound, and, for a while, the Firebird became his favorite guitar.
 

c_wester

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Since Clapton was playing through a 100 watt Marshall stack, he obviously backed way off on his volume to keep from drowning out Buddy on that jam; hence the thin tone. It's sort of the same situation that Eric found himself in on the famous live Cream performance of "Sunshine Of Your Love" on The Glen Campbell Goodtimes Hour in 1968. Due to the limited technical capabilities of television at that time ( or maybe simply that the director didn't want to fool with the hassle of balancing the roar of the Marshall stacks, ) Eric was forced to play at a very low volume with the expected results --- virtually no distortion or sustain. He was playing the 'Bird that time also. Make no mistake, though. When he playing the Firebird I at full volume as he normally did at concerts, he got a great, great sound out of it. As he later said in an interview, that one pickup had a "fantastic" sound, and, for a while, the Firebird became his favorite guitar.

thank you for writing my next post :2zone
 

c_wester

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I always tought that Clapton played on the Neck pick up... but after really "investigating" he seams to be riding the bridge pick up all the time... and getting the woman tone from simply going to zero on the tone knob... i tought he used the neck pup and the tone knob on zero
 

JRW8214@AOL.COM

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Yeah even Clapton commented a few years ago how its a huge mistake that people think he favored the neck pickup. I'd say about 3/4 of his playing back then was on the bridge and he adjusted his tone to his tastes. He did use the neck pickup for woman tone, mostly in conjunction with the bridge pickup. I know with my SG i get the closest to the actual 'Woman Tone' with both pickups on(infact even though Clapton says to do it with both tones off, i find its even better with one of the tones full on while the other is all the way off). Every now and then he would use the neck pickup for a lead when he needed to switch back and forth between two tones. For example on the I Feel Free solo he starts on the neck pickup with the tone rolled off but then hits the switch(because its faster than adjusting the tone knob) and goes to the bridge pickup with the tone opened up. Basically using the pickup switch as kind of a channel selector. Duane Allman was fond of doing this i believe, as did my #1 guy, Paul Kossoff, who also prefered the bridge pickup.
I use this method myself while playing Outside Woman Blues. I set the bridge pickup at about 7-8 on the volume and 5-8 on the tone for the rhythm guitar and for that lead after each verse i go to the neck pickup with the volume full up and the tone all the way off. Normally i just work the tone knob on my bridge pickups and leave the neck pickups for quiet, clean parts but in certain applications like that its easier and faster to just hit the switch with your hand instead of messing with a tone knob between parts.
 
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