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Jethro Tull Live at the Capital Centre 1977, Martin Barre w/ 1959 Les Paul Standard

marshall1987

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I'm just blown away with Martin Barre's live performance in 1977 at the Largo, MD, 12,000 seat arena, Capital Centre. If anyone wishes to experience a great example of the signature tone of a 1959 Gibson Les Paul "Burst", you need look no further.

It's hard to tell from the grainy concert video, but I'm pretty sure Martin Barre is playing his Les Paul straight into a Marshall Super Lead half-stack. He might have a Vox Wah-wah peddle out front, not sure. Clearly, he's one of the guitar greats out of England in the 1970s.

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O Riley

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Jan 22, 2021
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.

Wow, huge thank you for posting this!
We saw them the first time, when they came to San Diego.
They were supporting Led Zeppelin.
Totally kicked their ass. Bad night for Page and mates.
...people really didn't now what to make of them, having only
heard them from their first "album". But man, did they rock!

Second time, they were head liners and were even better. Damn.
Barre was crushing it. Fantastic show.

I remember it just like yesterday... Well, sort of....😎
 
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123sg

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Feb 24, 2021
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Thanks for posting, nice demonstration of a 59 Burst You say, 1977 at the end it sounds like a pre-lewd Some some metal guitars, who else is doing them kind of riffs Richie Blackmore? In 1977
 

123sg

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Thanks for posting, nice demonstration of a 59 Burst You say, 1977 at the end it sounds like a pre-lewd Some some metal guitars, who else is doing them kind of riffs Richie Blackmore? In 1977
 

marshall1987

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One defining characteristic of the '59 Les Paul I find most pleasing...is when Martin cuts the volume down and plays softer passages within the melody. In combination with his undistorted Marshall Super Lead, this produces a very distinct clean tone with a hollow "woody" timbre. It's very evident and pronounced when he plays the neck PAF (or both) at a low volume.

This tone is instantly recognizable and heard on so many Classic Rock albums from the '60s and '70s. In a way, it reminds me of Jimmy Page's tone on the 1970 Led Zeppelin III studio recording of "Since I've Been Loving You". Also, I believe keeping the PAF covers on the pickups....allows the player to achieve the distinct hollow, woody timbre to a greater degree.
 

Mattyboy75

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Love Jethro Tull. Listen to “Thick as a Brick” that’s all done on the 59LP according to an interview with Martin.
the musicianship and tightness on that record is fantastic.
 

marshall1987

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Love Jethro Tull. Listen to “Thick as a Brick” that’s all done on the 59LP according to an interview with Martin.
the musicianship and tightness on that record is fantastic.
Agree.

Jethro Tull employed a very talented individual to work on their studio arrangements from 1967-1976, before finally adding him to their stage lineup in 1977. His name is David "Dee" Palmer and you can see him in this concert playing keyboards on the left side of the stage. David shared keyboard duties with John Evan, Tull's comical stage character who usually dressed in all-white "Good Humor Ice Cream" garb. Tull's base player in this show is John Glascock. Ritchie Blackmore in a 1978 Guitar Player Magazine interview, named Glascock as one of the best rock bass players ever to come from England. Finally, Barrieimore Barlow, Tull's drummer, was named by John Bonham as one of the most talented rock drummers he'd ever seen. That's quite an endorsement. :cool:

IMO, there were very few Classic Rock acts in the world that could surpass Jethro Tull live in 1977. They were that good. I know, I was there.
 

Mattyboy75

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Don’t quote me but I think it was Isle of Wight 1970. There’s footage of Jethro Tull and I think it was the bass player but could be the comedy man mentioned above, anyway, whoever it was seemed to be having the best night they have ever had in their lives. If you watch it you will understand what I mean straightaway.
 

AlexPaish

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w7j3j46
 

thin sissy

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Thanks for posting, nice demonstration of a 59 Burst You say, 1977 at the end it sounds like a pre-lewd Some some metal guitars, who else is doing them kind of riffs Richie Blackmore? In 1977
I agree, very "modern" sounding for it's day. I've never thought of it before, but after watching this concert I hear similarities with Martin and Rory Gallagher, both in tone and playing. Rory is also a guitarist who IMHO sounded very modern in the early 70's, at least on some live concerts. The same applies to Mick Ronson (and many more I'm sure, but these always stood out to me).
 

123sg

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I agree, very "modern" sounding for it's day. I've never thought of it before, but after watching this concert I hear similarities with Martin and Rory Gallagher, both in tone and playing. Rory is also a guitarist who IMHO sounded very modern in the early 70's, at least on some live concerts. The same applies to Mick Ronson (and many more I'm sure, but these always stood out to me).
Yeah that was a great post I had to go back and watch it again sometime do they teach you classical guitar in kindergarten in England I noticed most Britt guitarist seem to be well-versed on classical phrasings mixed in with African American blues riffs
 

123sg

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Yeah that was a great post I had to go back and watch it again sometime do they teach you classical guitar in kindergarten in England I noticed most Britt guitarist seem to be well-versed on classical phrasings mixed in with African American blues riffs
 

marshall1987

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I have watched this Jethro Tull YouTube video about a dozen times. Plus I've viewed many more from this decade. In the early-to-mid '70s, the brilliant Martin Barre along with principal singer - songwriter - multi-instrumentalist Ian Anderson, created great music that doesn't really fit into any of the established categories of rock music of the period. Music critics struggled to find the appropriate "box" to put Tull into. Must have caused them fits.

IMO, there were only a handful of successful British & American recording artists at that time that might fit this bill. The group that immediately comes to my mind is the American progressive rock band "Kansas", especially when considered in a live concert setting. If Jethro Tull had a featured violin player in the lineup, they could be considered the British "version" of Kansas; or if you rather, Kansas the American version of Jethro Tull.
 
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123sg

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Joined
Feb 24, 2021
Messages
125
I have watched this Jethro Tull YouTube video about a dozen times. Plus I've viewed many more from this decade. In the early-to-mid '70s, the brilliant Martin Barre along with principal singer - songwriter - multi-instrumentalist Ian Anderson, created great music that fits squarely in the "classic/progressive/folk rock" genre.

IMO, there were only a handful of successful British & American recording artists at that time that might fit this bill. The group that immediately comes to my mind is the American progressive rock band "Kansas", especially when considered in a live concert setting. If Jethro Tull had a featured violin player in the lineup, they could be considered the British "version" of Kansas; or if you rather, Kansas the American version of Jethro Tull.
Yeah I just watched it again how to look at the encore solo near The end. What a bunch of well-versed musicians don’t think that they will make music like that again Seems to me they would seek out 15,000 seat stadium to play auditoriums to me it shows a commitment to their sound Can’t see the comparison with Kansas not a big fanOh well back to my 12 bar blues thanks
 

123sg

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Feb 24, 2021
Messages
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Yeah I just watched it again how to look at the encore solo near The end. What a bunch of well-versed musicians don’t think that they will make music like that again Seems to me they would seek out 15,000 seat stadium to play auditoriums to me it shows a commitment to their sound Can’t see the comparison with Kansas not a big fanOh well back to my 12 bar blues thanks
 
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