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Good/Bad Wood Years

brandtkronholm

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Joined
Dec 3, 2006
Messages
2,734

“ About James Potts
James is an amateur guitarist ”

😂
The article is incredibly dumb.
In fact, I think "music strive" is a fake website.
I googled some of the "musicians" and came up with almost nothing.
Maybe it's an AI project?
I often wonder about some of the posts on this forum too...are they AI? I skeptical about necro-posts (3-10 years old) from brand-new members with fewer than 5 posts.

Here's what google produced for the "music strive" violinist:
1) 2) https://larkspurs.bandcamp.com/album/larkspurs

WAT
 

Subliminal lanimilbuS

Active member
Joined
Sep 28, 2023
Messages
230
it's been over ten years.

Raise your hand if the fingerboard fell off your 2012.
This is a very good point. I have never seen one. I heard once of a guitar used for a Historic Makeover that had a poorly glued section of the fretboard, but with the level of quality control at a company like Gibson this was probably a one in a million thing. Many parts of really old guitars are laminates. The holly on the headstock for example. Haven't seen seen any 70 year old Les Pauls missing those.
 

MarcB

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
716
The article is incredibly dumb
Tbh., I read about a 1/3rd of the article and instantly dismissed it for lack of context.. and went straight to the source of who wrote it.. came across the author’s bio.. and just laughed..
it’s probably a university project.. or someone trying to establish a website, purely for advertising gains.. .. even the web name is utter rubbish..

Well done for investigating.. 👍
 

MarcB

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Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
716
Maybe it's an AI project?
I’ve never used AI.. but was curious.. so I signed up for free trial.. and asked AI to write about
“Gibson Guitars good wood, bad wood periods”
&
“Vintage Gibson Les Paul’s and the current prices” .. it literally took about 2mins to create this.. 😮


 
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MarcB

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
716
Here’s the AI written article .. without clicking the links..

Gibson Guitars Good Wood, Bad Wood Periods

Understanding The Importance Of Wood Quality In Gibson Guitars: A Brief Overview Of Tonewoods

When it comes to crafting exceptional guitars, Gibson has always recognized the significance of selecting high-quality tonewoods. The choice of tonewood greatly influences the tone, resonance, and overall performance of an instrument. Over the years, Gibson has experienced both good wood and bad wood periods, where fluctuations in wood quality affected their guitars' sound and playability. Tonewoods like mahogany, maple, rosewood, and spruce have long been favored by Gibson for their unique tonal characteristics.

Mahogany offers warmth and depth, while maple contributes brightness and sustain. Rosewood provides a rich harmonic complexity while spruce delivers clarity and projection. During the good wood periods, Gibson meticulously sourced premium-grade tonewoods that showcased these desirable qualities.

Exploring Gibson Guitars' Good Wood Period: Legendary Tonewoods That Defined Classic Tones

During its illustrious history, Gibson Guitars has experienced periods of unparalleled craftsmanship and innovation. One such era, known as the "Good Wood" period, stands out as a testament to the exceptional tonewoods that defined classic guitar tones. Spanning from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, this period saw Gibson utilizing exceptional materials that contributed to their iconic sound. Mahogany bodies and necks became synonymous with warmth and resonance, providing a solid foundation for rich sustain.

Combined with Brazilian rosewood fingerboards, these guitars produced an unmatched depth and complexity. The "Good Wood" period birthed legendary models like the Les Paul Standard and ES-335, cherished by musicians across genres. These instruments continue to be coveted for their distinct voice in today's music landscape.

The Dark Ages: Gibson Guitars' Bad Wood Period And Its Impact On Sound Quality

During the 1970s, Gibson Guitars experienced what is often referred to as the "bad wood period," a time when the company's instruments suffered from a decline in quality due to the use of subpar materials. This era was marked by a shift towards using cheaper, lower-quality woods in an attempt to cut costs and increase production. Unfortunately, this decision had a detrimental effect on the sound quality of Gibson guitars.

The use of inferior wood resulted in tonal inconsistencies, reduced sustain, and a lack of resonance in these instruments. Guitarists noticed a significant decline in overall playability and sound projection during this period. The bad wood period tarnished Gibson's reputation for crafting high-quality guitars with exceptional sound. Fortunately, as time went on, Gibson recognized their mistake and made efforts to rectify the situation.

From Past To Present: How Gibson Guitars Prioritizes Wood Quality And Maintains Superior Tonewoods

Throughout its storied history, Gibson Guitars has consistently prioritized wood quality, ensuring that their instruments produce superior tonal characteristics. Since the company's inception in 1902, Gibson has experimented with various tonewoods to achieve the perfect balance of resonance and sustain. In the early years, Gibson primarily utilized mahogany for its bodies and necks due to its warm tone and excellent resonance properties.

However, during what is commonly referred to as the "Bad Wood Period" in the late 1970s, quality control issues arose as a result of using lower-grade woods. Recognizing the importance of maintaining their reputation for exceptional tonal quality, Gibson underwent significant changes in recent decades. They now employ a meticulous process that involves sourcing high-quality tonewoods like mahogany, maple, and rosewood from sustainable suppliers.

—————
 

MarcB

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Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
716
Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitars And The Current Prices

Introduction To Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitars

The Gibson Les Paul is an iconic electric guitar that has left an indelible mark on the history of rock music. Renowned for its rich tone, exceptional craftsmanship, and timeless design, the vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars hold a special place in the hearts of musicians and collectors alike. These instruments were produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation from 1952 to 1960, known as the "Golden Era," and are highly sought after for their unmatched quality and legendary sound.

Vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars have become a symbol of prestige and artistry, with each instrument possessing its own unique character. From the stunning flame maple tops to the powerful PAF (Patent Applied For) humbucking pickups, these guitars represent a pinnacle of craftsmanship that continues to inspire musicians across generations.

Historical Significance And Features Of Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitars

The historical significance of vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars lies in their pioneering role in the evolution of electric guitars. Introduced in 1952, the Les Paul model revolutionized the music industry by offering a solid body construction that eliminated feedback issues and provided enhanced sustain. This innovation laid the foundation for modern electric guitar design. Vintage Les Pauls are renowned for their exceptional craftsmanship and tonal characteristics.

These instruments were crafted with meticulous attention to detail, featuring hand-carved maple tops, mahogany bodies, and set necks that contribute to their iconic resonance and sustain. Moreover, vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars were played by influential musicians who shaped the course of rock music. Legends like Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, and Slash have all wielded these iconic instruments on stage and in the studio, further adding to their historical significance.

Factors Affecting The Current Prices Of Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitars

The current prices of vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars are influenced by a multitude of factors that contribute to their desirability and value within the collector's market. One significant factor is the guitar's age, with older models typically commanding higher prices due to their rarity and historical significance. The guitar's condition also plays a crucial role, as well-preserved instruments with minimal wear and original parts tend to fetch higher prices.

Another determinant is the guitar's provenance or its association with famous musicians, such as Jimmy Page or Slash, which can significantly increase its value. Limited edition or special editions guitars often have higher price tags due to their exclusivity. Additionally, unique finishes or features like sunburst tops can impact the guitar's worth. Market demand and availability also influence pricing; scarcity drives up prices when demand surpasses supply.

Recent Trends In The Market For Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitars

The market for vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars has experienced significant fluctuations in recent years, reflecting changing consumer preferences and economic factors. One noticeable trend is the increasing demand for early 1950s models, such as the '52 Goldtop and '59 Sunburst, which are considered iconic and highly sought after by collectors and musicians alike. These guitars are known for their exceptional craftsmanship, tonal versatility, and historic significance, making them a favorite among vintage guitar enthusiasts.

Another notable trend is the rising prices of vintage Les Pauls across the board. As demand continues to outpace supply due to limited availability, prices have skyrocketed in the past decade. This surge has made it increasingly challenging for aspiring buyers to acquire these coveted instruments without breaking the bank. Furthermore, factors like celebrity endorsements and famous artists' associations with specific models have influenced market trends.

Evaluating The Authenticity And Condition Of Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitars

When considering the purchase of a vintage Gibson Les Paul guitar, it is crucial to assess its authenticity and condition. Authenticity verification is essential due to the prevalence of counterfeit instruments in the market. A thorough examination of serial numbers, headstock logos, hardware, and other intricate details can help determine whether the guitar is a genuine vintage Gibson Les Paul. Additionally, evaluating the condition is vital to ensure you are getting your money's worth.

Factors such as wear and tear, modifications, repairs, and originality can significantly affect both the value and playability of a vintage instrument. A close inspection of the body finish, frets, electronics, and any replaced parts will provide insights into its overall condition. Consulting reputable experts or experienced collectors can offer valuable guidance in assessing authenticity and condition.

Examples Of Noteworthy Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitar Sales And Prices

1. The 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard, also known as the "Holy Grail" of vintage guitars, has seen staggering price increases over the years. In 2019, an original '59 model in excellent condition sold for a whopping $1.5 million at auction. 2. A rare 1958 Gibson Les Paul Standard with a flametop finish recently fetched $875,000 at a private sale. This particular model is highly sought after due to its unique aesthetics and outstanding playability.

3. In 2017, a pristine 1960 Gibson Les Paul Standard Sunburst sold for $550,000 through a reputable vintage guitar dealer. Known for its rich tone and beautiful finish, this guitar is considered one of the finest examples of its era. 4.

Conclusion: Understanding The Investment Potential Of Vintage Gibson Les Paul Guitars

Vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars have proven to be a lucrative investment for collectors and musicians alike. The iconic brand and timeless design of these instruments have contributed to their enduring popularity and increasing value over time. As evidenced by the rising prices in the market, owning a vintage Gibson Les Paul is not only about having a remarkable musical instrument but also an opportunity to make a sound financial investment.

The scarcity of these guitars, coupled with their historical significance and exceptional craftsmanship, has ensured their desirability among enthusiasts. Moreover, the sustained demand from collectors worldwide has driven up their prices consistently. While investing in vintage instruments requires careful consideration, it is evident that Gibson Les Paul guitars have demonstrated strong appreciation potential.

Whether you are a musician looking for an instrument with character or an investor seeking an alternative asset class, vintage Gibson Les Paul guitars offer both artistic satisfaction and potential financial gains.
 

Bryansamui

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Joined
Jul 1, 2022
Messages
186
Dave Gilmore has the right idea on his touring pedal board.
View attachment 23749
Spot on..Also It's not easy to determine the tonal difference between 2 Les Pauls is because of the "Wood".
I could have several Classic 57 pickups and they all sound different . Pickups are inconsistent .Pots are not consistent either..
To determine its the 'wood' that you are actually listening to is a logistical nightmare to conduct that experiment.
 

J T

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Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Messages
10,488
I’ve never used AI.. but was curious.. so I signed up for free trial.. and asked AI to write about
“Gibson Guitars good wood, bad wood periods”
&
“Vintage Gibson Les Paul’s and the current prices” .. it literally took about 2mins to create this.. 😮
....

Nothing there that is new information. Just seems like well known facts with sentences wrapped around.

I don't know, are 52 Les Pauls really as desirable as 59's?

BTW, if that was AI, it just took your question and re-stated "Gibson Guitars". It's "Gibson Brands", I believe, which a real person would have probably known. More commonly , it's just "Gibson".
 

MarcB

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
716
Nothing there that is new information. Just seems like well known facts with sentences wrapped around.

I don't know, are 52 Les Pauls really as desirable as 59's?

BTW, if that was AI, it just took your question and re-stated "Gibson Guitars". It's "Gibson Brands", I believe, which a real person would have probably known. More commonly , it's just "Gibson".
Agreed.. it’s just info from the web.. regurgitated.. with truth and the lies combined.. so this just answers the question of AI.. is it a load of bull.. ?

Yes
 
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J T

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Oct 20, 2005
Messages
10,488
"If a lie is repeated often enough it becomes the truth."
A really, really bad person said that.

But lazy people don't look into it or care.
 

Wilko

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Mar 11, 2002
Messages
20,837
I found almost no problems with the AI article If considering all of the Gibson models it's largely true. I come to that based on published info as well as personal experience (I'm 60). The archtops and acoustics really suffered during the 70s. starting in the late 60s even the high end archtops got laminated backs and sides. Square shouldered flattops and even the Jumbos were known be average at best and couldn't keep up with Martin or (dare I say it) the new bright sound of the Ovations that came and took over.

Only a couple details would change if only considering the Les Paul model. Late 60s in when the wood (Gruhn, Bacon, Day) supplies changed. This change did alter the overall resonance but did not have negative effects on sustain. Actually the opposite was true. While the sound was largely changed, for many that change was welcome and those instruments are considered superior for certain heavier style of rock music. They were notably different in weight and feel due to those wood differences to the 50s models that became sought after as they were a bit lighter and had loud PAF pickups (8k+) compared to the 70s being either minihum or 7.6k full size T-Tops.
 
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