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Future Pricing Thread

E.M.

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Aug 6, 2016
Messages
141
Millennials are set to become the wealthiest generation (despite their near constant sniveling). Anyone agree that we’re about to see a spike in vintage gear prices (vs Boomer spike we saw in the 90s/00s) as millennials take over luxury buying power? I suspect we might.

 

bern1

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Nov 23, 2004
Messages
1,282
This is an interesting question. I read the article. The boomers' well to do-ness has everything to do with the fact they came of age in a post world war expanding economy. Not all of them benefited from this however. There will also be many more millenials than boomers. So yes, they are set to take over the world. Those millenials who have yet to make their mark will do so in a contracting economy. It is reasonable to assume that many of them will inherit some assets of their parents. Where this leaves future pricing of vintage guitars is anybody's guess. I have not seen that millenials care all that much about vintage guitars. Sure, some of them do. Are there going to be enough of them that care when the floodgates open? I'm talking about the "liquidation" of things like vintage guitars when the boomers who have them decide to depart. I suspect that the answer is wide open with no sure-fire answer.

Speaking personally as a boomer and life long vintage enthusiast, I am less and less interested in individual vintage guitars and amps. Why? Because today you don't have to buy vintage in order to get good or even great equipment. Could it be that some others are starting to think like this? Including millenials.
 

JASIII

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Sep 19, 2020
Messages
113
Seems to me Boomers interest in vintage guitars comes from the fact that they are important tools/artifacts of the time when they came of age. Not so much for Millenials. I could see vintage synths and electronic gear being of more interest to them. I hope so anyway.
 

RhinestoneStrat

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Aug 27, 2019
Messages
296
At least Millenials are more technologically advanced than Boomers, especially in the information age that we live in. And they are now our current future generation that will be owning vintage guitars from their parents and selling them 10 times the price! :confused:

 

MarcB

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Sep 1, 2023
Messages
995
Interesting subject..
my view on current sales prices is that most of the high end guitars are still bought by boomers.. the millennials are not into things like Antiques etc ..they simply do not interest them.. that said.. (as discussed before) when items become “luxury” item, that’s a different ball park.. it becomes an investment piece, status object.. so therefore command a high premium..
the question would be.. how do you maintain a future market for vintage guitars?
This, I would say, is currently being answered by Gibson’s marketing team.. with the new premium historic range of guitars.. which trade on the history of the brand, the exclusivity and luxury aspects.

Which J T (on another thread) point out..
For collectors and flippers

Will most likely never see a stage.
 
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E.M.

Active member
Joined
Aug 6, 2016
Messages
141
Interesting subject..
my view on current sales prices is that most of the high end guitars are still bought by boomers.. the millennials are not into things like Antiques etc ..they simply do not interest them.. that said.. (as discussed before) when items become “luxury” item, that’s a different ball park.. it becomes an investment piece, status object.. so therefore command a high premium..
the question would be.. how do you maintain a future market for vintage guitars?
This, I would say, is currently being answered by Gibson’s marketing team.. with the new premium historic range of guitars.. which trade on the history of the brand, the exclusivity and luxury aspects.

Which J T (on another thread) point out..
Agree - there’s a difference between antiques (ie nostalgia) vs luxury (ie status). Nostalgia is buying a birth year ‘65 Strat, luxury is leveraged by buying a rare and valuable guitar for the sole purpose of wealth virtue signaling. However a lot of millennials are into handmade goods, locally sourced products, artisanal crafts, fair labor, eco friendly, etc - so I can envision a not so distant future where Millennials place a premium on both vintage gear that meet these criteria and current manufacturers that scale down to make niche products.
 
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MarcB

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Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
995
distant future
I think there will always be a market demand for guitars, motorcycles and watches.. simply because they exist.

Side bar:
Two of the three True Historic LPs, I was considering (which have been listed for a month or more)
sold today ?

I blame the new Anderton’s Murphy Lab video.
 
Last edited:

AubreySporer

New member
Joined
Oct 3, 2023
Messages
4
This is an interesting question. I read the article. The boomers' well to do-ness has everything to do with the fact they came of age in a post world war expanding economy. Not all of them benefited from this however. There will also be many more millenials than boomers. So yes, they are set to take over the world. Those millenials who have yet to make their mark will do so in a contracting economy. It is reasonable to assume that many of them will inherit some assets of their parents. Where this leaves future pricing of vintage guitars is anybody's guess. I have not seen that millenials care all that much about vintage guitars. Sure, some of them do. Are there going to be enough of them that care when the floodgates open? I'm talking about the "liquidation" of things like vintage guitars when the boomers who have them decide to depart. I suspect that the answer is wide open with no sure-fire answer.

Speaking personally as a boomer and life long vintage enthusiast, I am less and less interested in individual vintage guitars and amps. Why? Because today you don't have to buy vintage in order to get good or even great equipment. Could it be that some others are starting to think like this? Including millenials.






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J T

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Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Messages
10,519
Take, for example, the Kurt Cobain Mustang. An average run of the mill Fender. No specialness about it. Any comparable Fender will sound and play like it. The feeding frenzy that drove the price up to a million and a half dollars was because Kurt Cobian played it. Kurt Cobain played it. Yeah, so what? Will playing that guitar suddenly emit a mysterious and supernatural power to its player like drawing the sword from the stone? Hmm, who knows? It's now 1.5 million worth of warm fuzzies to somebody.
 
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