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Will I Devalue My 1999 Les Paul Classic If I...

Keefoman

Active member
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
576
I had a 2001 Classic many years ago where I swapped the pickups for Lollars, the electronics for an RS Kit and the bridge and stoptail to parts from an R9. It didn't devalue the guitar, but I certainly didn't get back the money I paid for the parts.
 

Gibbons59

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2018
Messages
45
If you aren't 100% happy with your instrument, and don't make the changes, you've already "devalued" it for yourself. I never concern myself with resale value. In fact, I decided long ago that I'm never going to sell any more of my guitars- no matter the circumstances. I regret selling almost every one I ever have, and won't make the mistake again.
 

mjross

Active member
Joined
May 11, 2019
Messages
197
I’ll purchased several Gibson guitars lately with the intention of making mods. However, the more I play them the more I tell myself this guitar sounds damn good as is! I have to ask myself if the mods would make that much of a difference. These new Gibsons are pretty good right out the gate.

I’m a car freak and I learned long ago that in terms of resale STOCK is always best. People tend to want a car, especially a high performance car, that has not been messed with. I’m starting to think that in regard to guitars this may be the way to go also.

One exception is if the guitar was modified by a reputable builder like Historic Makeovers or other known guitar modifier as I feel they know what they are doing. I just have a hard time buying a modified guitar that was performed but some guy on his kitchen table at home. That’s just me, YMMV!
 
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torren61

Active member
Joined
May 11, 2010
Messages
228
I’ll purchased several Gibson guitars lately with the intention of making mods. However, the more I play them the more I tell myself this guitar sounds damn good as is! I have to ask myself if the mods would make that much of a difference. These new Gibsons are pretty good right out the gate.

I’m a car freak and I learned long ago that in terms of resale STOCK is always best. People tend to want a car, especially a high performance car, that has not been messed with. I’m starting to think that in regard to guitars this many be the way to go also.

One exception is if the guitar was modified by a reputable builder like Historic Makeovers or other known guitar modifier as I feel they know what they are doing. I just have a hard time buying a modified guitar that was performed but some guy on his kitchen table at home. That’s just me, YMMV!
Mine is a '99. The way I modded it makes it easy to put it back to stock. I didn't do the work at my kitchen table, I did the work here:

C54CCA6F-C490-4821-8E8C-5037F98389F2_1_201_a.jpeg

:)
 

mjross

Active member
Joined
May 11, 2019
Messages
197
Mine is a '99. The way I modded it makes it easy to put it back to stock. I didn't do the work at my kitchen table, I did the work here:

View attachment 18384

:)
Exception, not the rule! I’ve seen some real “kitchen table” abortions in my many years of purchasing guitars. In my early years I may have been guilty of this act myself. Today, if I need a mod performed I take it to my tech who is a real professional! If and when I sell a guitar I can pass it on to the next guy knowing that any mods have been performed correctly.
 
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uncajoey

Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
54
Excuse my derailing this discussion by asking the question, but why would anyone buy parts to modify the sound of an instrument before even plugging it in to hear it? I don’t get it. How do you know you won’t like the stock pickups?
 

jb_abides

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
5,210
Excuse my derailing this discussion by asking the question, but why would anyone buy parts to modify the sound of an instrument before even plugging it in to hear it? I don’t get it. How do you know you won’t like the stock pickups?

While Classics have gone on to have different specs/pickups; they were best known for being equipped with super hot ceramic pickups, this 90s/00s era in particular.

Many folks desire other attributes of the Classic model e.g. the slim taper neck, but just know from experience the hot ceramics aren't part of their tonal palette, hence the swaps...
 

uncajoey

Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
54
Yes, in the long term. Classics from that era are becoming rare in unmolested condition, and today’s trend against ceramic pickups and ‘snot’ inlays are short term, like quartz countertops and LVP flooring.
 

lure555

Swirling Vortex of Sound, Classic Club
Joined
Jul 15, 2001
Messages
3,410
I love Classics, but hate those pickups. I've had several Classics from that era and sometimes swapped pickups before even playing the guitar. It's an instrument, not an investment.
 

Cholo

Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2002
Messages
35
I have 3 Classics and they all have different pickup besides the hotter ceramics:

P90's R/B
Antiquities R/B
59' Model R/Seth Lovers B
 
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