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The Les Paul as investment

RiverCityVintage

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Jul 23, 2019
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Your response is 16 & 1/2 years after the question. Do you think he will see your answer? :hmm

lol

If you collect guitars you will usually buy at retail and sell closer to wholesale. It depends on how much time you are willing to spend marketing to get the best price.
There may be a few current models that will be worth more in the future but the hope for that is not an advisable investment strategy.

I do not buy at retail. I am a small business dealing in vintage, and I would explain what I do further, but I think that is unnecessary, and it would probably incite irrational rage followed by slurs and insults from these grumpy older folks.

-------------

Ya'll grumpy people are funny. I just breeze past the nonsense and look for where people stay on topic. I don't care how old any of you are, and I never asked. My math is just fine.

I just care how old you act.


Thanks for the history lesson; however with respect to the Les Paul Classic guitars, I used the term "prehistoric" in the context of those instruments that were marketed and sold in the early '90s before the launch of the Historic Reissue models. I didn't suggest that the early Les Paul Classics were "prehistoric" reissue models like those from 1983 onward.

For sure. I just like to make things clear since a lot of folks that are trying to learn will search these keywords on google, and this page will certainly pop up. I have seen models advertised as from a ''prehistoric'' era, and that's not very helpful in the market for folks that are looking for a Prehistoric Les Paul.

Personally I call it the early henry j era, or pre custom shop, as many others do.
 
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El Gringo

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Apr 8, 2015
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5,375
I have to say even if I had disposable income to be able to procure a vintage 58 or 59 Burst , I would not buy it as an investment ! I would play it and cherish it and really just play it . Never mind putting up on the wall or inside glass . I would play the crap out of it and enjoy to my last breathe . I know I sound like a broken record , but for me at the end of the day it's all about having fun !!!!!!! Just like it was for me when I was a kid and was drawn to the instrument . From First grade Violin lessons to switching over to the Cello, and then when I was starting high school being drawn to the guitar . All the while a product of public school music programs and bless them for exposing me and giving me the appreciation for the Arts . It greatly saddens me when I hear or read about school districts slashing arts and music budgets with dwindling funds and shrinking budgets , as I feel it deprives kids of enrichment of the arts to there life and growing there minds and souls ! Pick up an instrument to have fun !!!!!!!!!
 

marshall1987

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Jan 30, 2005
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For sure. I just like to make things clear since a lot of folks that are trying to learn will search these keywords on google, and this page will certainly pop up. I have seen models advertised as from a ''prehistoric'' era, and that's not very helpful in the market for folks that are looking for a Prehistoric Les Paul.

Personally I call it the early henry j era, or pre custom shop, as many others do.

You can save the lesson on Gibson guitar model terminology and jargon for another thread.....that wasn't really the subject of my original post. :hmm.

If I may continue.....

The thrust of my original post was to seek enlightenment regarding the relative investment value of the early 1990s Les Paul Classic w/ "Les Paul Model" silk screened on the headstock. My first-hand experience with one of these guitars left me underwhelmed overall. Given my experience and impressions with this model (as restated below), I wouldn't buy one at any price. :dang



Help me understand all the fawning over early '90s Les Paul Classic w/ "Les Paul Model" on the headstock (pre-Historic)..

when compared to the slightly later '90s production LP Classic that have "Les Paul Classic" silkscreened on the headstock (Historic era).

So in the mid-90s Gibson changes one word on the headstock and the collector value decreases significantly?


FWIW...my friend owned one of the early Les Paul Classics (1991...??) that identified it as a "Les Paul Model". I struggled to play that guitar, what with it's super skinny neck (<0.800"), abnormally high bridge position, 10 lb. weight, green fingerboard inlays, and the awful Gibson 500T ceramic pickups and odd control cavity components. :hmm

The owner of this particular LP Classic went on and on about the Les Paul Model silkscreen as though that made all the difference in the world. I couldn't hand that guitar back to him quickly enough. :dang
 

Tom Wittrock

Les Paul Forum Co-Owner
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Aug 2, 2001
Messages
42,567
… it would probably incite irrational rage followed by slurs and insults from these grumpy older folks.

-------------

Ya'll grumpy people are funny. I just breeze past the nonsense and look for where people stay on topic. I don't care how old any of you are, and I never asked. My math is just fine.

I just care how old you act.


l:rofll
 

thin sissy

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Jan 2, 2006
Messages
2,627
yeah you’re right. It was that other guy. I had someone in another forum accuse me of being a boomer. It’s like some comeback now for criticizing someone older. Anyhow sorry about that. I got confused. It’s like some new millennial put down that keeps getting repeated. Anyhow, of course it’s a generalization. There are always exceptions. I just don’t see a market 20-30 years down the road for this stuff like there is today. It seems protools and modeling amps and all that crap is becoming the new thing. Even for guys in my age group. If there a market, I think it’ll be for museum quality stuff and for the Paul Allen types who collect very specific items. That’s my prediction. I think the bubble already has burst a bit. Vintage prices have gone down a bit.
No worries man :salude

I admit I have no idea whats going to happen to the vintage market down the road. But I think there's always going to be guitar nerds no matter the general music scene :)
 

RC67

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Sep 14, 2018
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Hey all, I'm looking for some advice. I have a 2012 CC # 6 in mint shape, but am considering trading for a late 1968-early 1969 ebony LP. The 68 is in fantastic overall shape, but has 70-s tuners and pickups. should I trade for the cool old wood or keep the 2012 CC # 6. ( ps I know what Mike Slub would tell me, lol)

RC67
 

Big Al

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Hey all, I'm looking for some advice. I have a 2012 CC # 6 in mint shape, but am considering trading for a late 1968-early 1969 ebony LP. The 68 is in fantastic overall shape, but has 70-s tuners and pickups. should I trade for the cool old wood or keep the 2012 CC # 6. ( ps I know what Mike Slub would tell me, lol)

RC67

You know what you got to do. In the end, ideally, you end up with the guitar you want the most.
 

Tom Wittrock

Les Paul Forum Co-Owner
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Aug 2, 2001
Messages
42,567
Hey all, I'm looking for some advice. I have a 2012 CC # 6 in mint shape, but am considering trading for a late 1968-early 1969 ebony LP. The 68 is in fantastic overall shape, but has 70-s tuners and pickups. should I trade for the cool old wood or keep the 2012 CC # 6. ( ps I know what Mike Slub would tell me, lol)

RC67

Which one plays the best?
Which one sounds the best?
:hmm
 

RC67

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Sep 14, 2018
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Which one plays the best?
Which one sounds the best?
:hmm[Hmmm, thanks for the reply... i suck as a player so I took both to a pro. The 68 is amazing, but worth more that the CC6 in the current market... think i will try to work out a deal. I have a 65 SGJ that really needs a friend, lol. If it works out, ill post s a few pics]
 

RC67

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Sep 14, 2018
Messages
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You know what you got to do. In the end, ideally, you end up with the guitar you want the most.[thanks man, I really like the cool factor of the old wood. I took it to a pro to play. It sounded amazing... think I will try to work out a deal]
 

RC67

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Sep 14, 2018
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Thanks for all the input re: possible trade. Worked it out but it cost much more than expected. Well worth it. It turns out to be the 1959 neck profile...wow...been playing the 68 LPC through my original 1969 Fender Bandmaster Reverb amp. The bridge 1970 Dimarzio Super Distortion pick up absolutely is killer. A great compliment to my 1965 SGJ sound....Happy with the family now. Cheers :)
 

mattnew33

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Jul 14, 2016
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138
Zombie thread.......


but...

in 2001 I bought a 1972 Custom for $900
in 2009 I sold that same guitar for $2500
If I look today, i'm hard pressed to find a similar guitar for sale for under $4k on reverb/ebay... oops

in 2016 I bought a 2008 '68 reissue custom for $2200
looking today, I'm hard pressed to find one offered for under $3500, though there are a few...

my point... I dunno, I never bought them to make money... and I wouldn't have thought either would have appreciated. If I'd tried to guess the market there I would have failed miserably. I think what I see is basically the cost of the old ( non-50's ) guitars is aligning with the cost of new... they aren't really increasing in value, but you can't really get a good used one for a deal much anymore.. they cost the same as a new one.
 

RiverCityVintage

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Jul 23, 2019
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You can save the lesson on Gibson guitar model terminology and jargon for another thread.....that wasn't really the subject of my original post. :hmm.

If I may continue.....

The thrust of my original post was to seek enlightenment regarding the relative investment value of the early 1990s Les Paul Classic w/ "Les Paul Model" silk screened on the headstock. My first-hand experience with one of these guitars left me underwhelmed overall. Given my experience and impressions with this model (as restated below), I wouldn't buy one at any price. :dang

:bh
 

dentalcusp

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Mar 12, 2016
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Would I say a guitar is a good investment...NO. I would agree with the financial adviser to put your money in the stock market. You will be much further ahead if interested in making money.
But I will say I still have my 1st new guitar ( Fender Telecaster 1967 ) which I paid $225.00 in 1967 and is in mint condition and 100% original .
Is it worth alot of $ today ...Hell yes but I waited over 50 Yrs to get there. Think about this. If I invested that $225.00 in the stock markert it would have done better. But will I ever get rid of my Tele..Hell No it's too beautiful and I do pick it up and still play it today. So the question is.... what's better....the money sitting in the stock market or having that beautiful vintage guitar to pick up and play any time and bringing back all those great band memories. Take your pick.
 

Big Al

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Nobody reads anymore.

NOT VINTAGE GUITARS
NOT HOLDING FOR 50 YRS

The op wanted to buy a new stock model to flip for " significantly more " profit within 5 yrs.
 

Tom Wittrock

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Nobody reads anymore.

NOT VINTAGE GUITARS
NOT HOLDING FOR 50 YRS

The op wanted to buy a new stock model to flip for " significantly more " profit within 5 yrs.

True, but it is not unusual for threads this old [over 16 years] for new posters not to have read the original post and instead, read the title only.

My guitar investments have paid off handsomely.
And in 2020 I will have had this one for 40 years, playing it at almost every gig. The dividends have far outweighed the costs [or resale value]. :ganz


14100516_1080545315368198_5193845913558121806_n.jpg


:salude
 

dentalcusp

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Mar 12, 2016
Messages
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True, but it is not unusual for threads this old [over 16 years] for new posters not to have read the original post and instead, read the title only.

My guitar investments have paid off handsomely.
And in 2020 I will have had this one for 40 years, playing it at almost every gig. The dividends have far outweighed the costs [or resale value]. :ganz


14100516_1080545315368198_5193845913558121806_n.jpg


:salude
I see you folks aren't financially savy. My point was that you are not going to make any sort of real money by holding a guitar for 5 to 10 years. ( I don't care what brand it is ) Unless it's some sort of very limited edition or one of a kind and most importanly find someone to pay you the inflated price.

You see in the financial world it's not that difficult (if you know what your doing) to triple/quadruple your money whether it's $100.00 or $100,000.00 in a span of 5 years. Even if you know nothing about the stockmarket you will still end up ahead in 5 years and be very liquid to boot. That's not happening with guitars.
 
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