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Mid 60s Hummindbird Vs. Mid 60s Southern Jumbo

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You know, It's probably just "self doubt", but is there really any difference in features, bracing, materials, etc between these guitars *Besides* the cosmetic flowery design on the pickguard and the material of the pickguard?

I've never owned a Hummingbird (or really any square shouldered mid 60s Gibson) that I thought has a nice open and crisp sound like a dread should, but I picked up a '65 SJ last night that absolutely sings! I was showing a friend this morning and his response was, "Oh, thats just a hummingbird with no bird on it".

The simplicity in the comment surprised me, but after further inspection, that seems to be the only difference! I prefer the look myself, but it seems that hummingbirds demand about $1k more than SJ's. Is that damn "decoration" worth that much?

Thoughts please.
 

christophervolum

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it shouldn't matter what's on the pickgaurd. what should matter is which sounds better. that said, i'm a hummingbird guy.

christophervolume-albums-live-shots-picture42867-summer-2011.jpg
 

Prototype

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Some Hummingbirds had maple back & sides.

A mid 60's SJ is really a lot more like a Hummingbird than an SJ. By the mid 60's everything had changed from the original specs of the 1940's - body shape, nut width, pickguard shape, bridge, bracing, and finish color.
 

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it shouldn't matter what's on the pickgaurd. what should matter is which sounds better. that said, i'm a hummingbird guy.

christophervolume-albums-live-shots-picture42867-summer-2011.jpg

Great shot!

...but that shot proves my point, you can't see any flowers or birds on your pickguard (probably wore off from playing or whatever) ....does it then become a country western SJ?

The only difference is the painted picture.

...and I know about the maple hummingbirds, those are anomalies. You can't really use that as an example.
 

christophervolum

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Great shot!

...but that shot proves my point, you can't see any flowers or birds on your pickguard (probably wore off from playing or whatever) ....does it then become a country western SJ?

The only difference is the painted picture.

...and I know about the maple hummingbirds, those are anomalies. You can't really use that as an example.

thanks. yes, most of the flower motif has been rubbed off from gigging. mine is a 1998.
 

lonesomesheik

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High Tide & Green Grass sure brings back sweet memories ( & Keith's blue glasses I reckon), I spend all my Xmas pocket money for that album, my Mum couldn't believe it!!!! Those were the days!!!
:jim:jim:jim
 

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Here's a picture of my newly acquired 1965 Southern Jumbo AKA Country Western.

 

Top Gun

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With the exceptions of the very 1st Hummingbirds ever made, both Hummingbirds and Doves have a longer scale Length (25 & ½ length).
Whereas, Southern Jumbos & Country Westerns have the shorter scale length (24 & ¾ length). The 1st Hummingbirds were also this shorter scale length...
 

Top Gun

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Forgot to mention that Hummingbird’s have a one piece Mahogany back. The SJ’s & CW’s have a two-piece back.
 

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Not really. :ganz
Really? That's what they were called, they even put a label inside that said that.

And hummingbirds had two piece backs just like the other mahogany guitars.

The only diff was the tuners and styrene guard, the scale changed on both models the sme time as far as I can see.
 

Tom Wittrock

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Really? That's what they were called, they even put a label inside that said that.

The Country Western was only offered in natural finish, and had a unique label.
The SJ was sunburst during the years that the Country Western model name was used.

Just as a Les Paul TV Model is not a Les Paul Junior. :salude
 

Top Gun

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1963 Sunburst "Maple" Hummingbird

63_maple_hummingbird_body_web.jpg


Early 1965 Blonde Hummingbird

65_blonde hummingbird_body_web.jpg
 

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The Country Western was only offered in natural finish, and had a unique label.
The SJ was sunburst during the years that the Country Western model name was used.

Just as a Les Paul TV Model is not a Les Paul Junior. :salude

Hmm. So both could be called southern jumbos, but only one with a natural top can be called a country western? Man, Gibson sure did like to "expand the line" using nothing other than finish! Could you imagine the confusion today with all the different finishes of "j 45"?! Lol
 

Tom Wittrock

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Hmm. So both could be called southern jumbos, but only one with a natural top can be called a country western? Man, Gibson sure did like to "expand the line" using nothing other than finish! Could you imagine the confusion today with all the different finishes of "j 45"?! Lol

The only one called a Country Western would be the one with that specific label in it.
Without the label, a natural colored SJ is an SJN.
 
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