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How to get weather checking on my '11 R8 ???

gypsyseven

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Nov 17, 2009
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+1 ...though I'm not in Canada ...however, I did get some slight checking from just the opposite ...that is, having it ( my '99 historic 335 ) out in the intense summer heat and coming into an air-conditioned room ..go figure :hmm

I´ll try that within the next few days....
 

Triburst

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Feb 12, 2006
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I am so glad I'm not the only one around here that isn't a fan of fake aging.

My guitars get their mojo the old fashioned way.... They EARN it.:2zone
 

Sct13

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Oct 27, 2011
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it needs to be "Cold Soaked" over night. I did it once with an R9 here in Michigan it was 17 Degrees when I put it out, about 7pm went below 0 over night and brought it in around 3 am. It checked in a few places. All of the wood must contract and the finish become brittle from the cold. 39 degrees. aint gonna do it. When the expansion happens due to warm moist air thats when its "likely" to occur. Also the craks show up when it cooler in the environment. For instance I took it out to photograph it in the warm sun this summer and some of the checks seemed to close up. they came back in the shade.
 

Sct13

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Oct 27, 2011
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+1 ...though I'm not in Canada ...however, I did get some slight checking from just the opposite ...that is, having it ( my '99 historic 335 ) out in the intense summer heat and coming into an air-conditioned room ..go figure :hmm

Expansion and contraction,
 

sinner

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Jul 23, 2004
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3,704
normal_Les%20Pauls%20in%20the%20snow.jpg


(photo "borrowed" from somewhere here in the LPF--thanks!)

Not sure if this method would work for "checking" but the photo sure makes a great Holiday Card!
 

Sct13

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Oct 27, 2011
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Firstly, let time "damage" your finish. Cold weather checking is risky. You could induce a crack that is minute right now but you could aggravate it. and suddenly something is loose that is not supposed to be.

It easier to " age " or distress the metal parts and all that is reversible. by obtaining new parts. I find it fun to tinker with that. Vinegar fumes Diluted enchant solution, Muriatic acid will distress nickel plating but not chrome. Go real slow and easy and don't over do it. Vintage guitars still have some shine. Pay attention to where you hands rest while you play. Plastics can be stained, Again only in small amounts and tastefully. Use existing examples of the real vintage ones. You will eventually find what your after, and then realize that playing it extensively will do most of it.

My humble advice is to leave the finish be. I do allow them to sunbathe. After I did an HM I could see that my efforts were futile their finishes are superb because the process is accelerated from the start using the correct dyes, techniques and nitro formula.

I am aging tuners right now to replicate what DMC has done. Pretty cool stuff.
 

sharky

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Jan 25, 2012
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I am aging tuners right now to replicate what DMC has done. Pretty cool stuff.

are you dying the tuner tips? What do you use for that?

Vinegar fumes do a great job on the nickel plating of the tuner housings, did that several times. PUP covers and tailpieces as well
 

Sct13

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are you dying the tuner tips? What do you use for that?

Vinegar fumes do a great job on the nickel plating of the tuner housings, did that several times. PUP covers and tailpieces as well

Oh those damn tips.....I have tried brown Shoe polish, amber nitro, Various wood stains, diluted wood stains and Acetone, and I am at a standstill on those. The problem is accelerating the plastics to discolor. colorant or any sort of pigment that lies on top of the plastic just looks hokey. I am getting ready to try a long blast of ultraviolet light through a Fresnel lens in a dark room with convex and concave mirrors with added cigarette smoke, human skin oils and whatever else is on your hands on gig night, up to and including beer, pretzel salt, grease from that stinky fryer. And that chick you just met in the dressing room. THEN went and tuned that guitar.

Seriously, I just picked up a set of DMC Tuners and there is (or what looks like) rust in the plastic. It has an interesting effect. I THINK they may have put an iron powder in the mix and the exposed particles oxidize. But no way to prove that. Because its not a pigment and its random. I am thinking of getting Fake 58's and be done with it.

Yes I am Gassing some tuners with vinegar and it does work very well....Now The DMC's have an interesting oxidation on them.
 

DanD

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Apr 8, 2007
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2,366
If my memory serves me there was a LP Classic thread where the guitars previous owner had kept the guitar in his trunk almost exclusively. That guitar looked ancient at 20 something years old. i can't remember exactly what the thread topic was, but it's along the same lines as this one.

If you find the thread you'll see what constant temp changes can do. :peace2
 

Sct13

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Oct 27, 2011
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I think I know which one, It gets hot in a trunk even on a cold day, moisture and then cold extreme damage....might be fun!

I friend of mine left his 72 Gold Top in his trunk on a cold winters day/night, when he showed for band practice the following day he opened his case and nearly cried. I couldn't figure out what his problem was. Me and the Bass player thought it looked awesome. And it was minor checking. It was a pristine guitar though.
 

sharky

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Jan 25, 2012
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I read about good succes made discoloring the tuner tips with hydrogene peroxyde. Should work without makeing them britle though. After that one could try to put on some plastic airplane model color and wipe it off right away to get a random look. Those colors should at least stay on the material
 

Uncle Gary

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Oct 15, 2006
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I friend of mine left his 72 Gold Top in his trunk on a cold winters day/night, when he showed for band practice the following day he opened his case and nearly cried. I couldn't figure out what his problem was. Me and the Bass player thought it looked awesome. And it was minor checking. It was a pristine guitar though.

I understand this. Back in the day, we tried to avoid having the finish crack on our guitars. We didn't have much money, and guitars were expensive. If you were lucky enough to get a good guitar, you took care of it and tried to make it last.

If I want to see something that looks 60 years old and worn out, all I have to do is look in a mirror.:wah
 

cryptozoo

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Jun 25, 2008
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2,738
I understand this. Back in the day, we tried to avoid having the finish crack on our guitars. We didn't have much money, and guitars were expensive. If you were lucky enough to get a good guitar, you took care of it and tried to make it last.

If I want to see something that looks 60 years old and worn out, all I have to do is look in a mirror.:wah

Well said. Let them age naturally, kids.
 

Trennasol

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Feb 16, 2002
Messages
895
We all have our own opinions on this and here's mine. Yes, I love the look of a VINTAGE Les Paul with natural checking. However, I've yet to see a Historic with the modern finish that Gibson is doing these days look 'right' finished checked, regardless of the method of checking. It looks weird and off to me. The ONLY way I'd go for checking on one of my Historics is to send it off and have it refinished properly and then let nature take it's course. Play the hell out of it and let the guitar age naturally is my approach.
 

Big Al

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Apr 24, 2002
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14,379
My opinion is why all the love for checking?? I'm with Uncle Gary on this, to damage the finish of a guitar for what??? What is gained by damaging the finish? What Mojo or desirable effect is gained by ruining the finish? I won't buy pants with holes in them either. Tinting plastics and sun fading finishes, knocking the shine of metal ect.. I can see, it isn't destructive or compromises the integrity of the guitar, mostly a cosmetic thing. But to purposely damage a guitar for pretend age or ..... I don't know what???
 

58mike

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Aug 9, 2006
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The other day I left my 2002 R4 Black Beauty outside for ten hours when the temperature was -20 Celsius. Then I brought it into the house and used a hair dryer to warm it up. No checking whatsoever. This tells about the amount of plasticisers used in the modern lacquer.
 

Big Al

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Apr 24, 2002
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14,379
The other day I left my 2002 R4 Black Beauty outside for ten hours when the temperature was -20 Celsius. Then I brought it into the house and used a hair dryer to warm it up. No checking whatsoever. This tells about the amount of plasticisers used in the modern lacquer.

It tells me about the ridiculous lengths some take to ruin their guitars. Somehow freezing the piss out of a Les Paul and then hitting it with hot air doesn't seem like a good thing.
 

Sct13

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Oct 27, 2011
Messages
569
My opinion is why all the love for checking?? I'm with Uncle Gary on this, to damage the finish of a guitar for what??? What is gained by damaging the finish? What Mojo or desirable effect is gained by ruining the finish? I won't buy pants with holes in them either. Tinting plastics and sun fading finishes, knocking the shine of metal ect.. I can see, it isn't destructive or compromises the integrity of the guitar, mostly a cosmetic thing. But to purposely damage a guitar for pretend age or ..... I don't know what???


I wondered the same thing a few years ago when I saw Fender with the "Roadworn" series. I had no idea it was a "thing" When I got into LP again after a 10 year hiatus from Gibson all together, I reintroduced myself to the burst and all of its nuances. Then went to a few guitar shows and saw some true vintage guitars. Then I saw their price tags. Unreachable, untouchable, ONLY for the Affluent and well to do (which I am NOT) Do I want to spend $2000
on a LP Jr that is checked and vintage? Sure. But its not a burst. So how do I get a burst? Do what fender did.....Make one. Therein lies your answer. I do not have 150,000 to blow on a burst but I can scrounge and save for a historic and tinker until I have a reasonable facsimile of a burst. That will satisfy me for the time being. I was a model tank airplane builder as a kid. This kind of detail work is sort of therapy for my troubles. I doesn't make sense to some. Your guitar is probably a tool to produce and make music for a living, That's the dream for me. at my age its difficult to form a band. Think of it as aging a craftsman 5/8 boxend wrench as a hobby, an auto mechanic would laugh his ass off because he has five that are already aged......:rofl

Anyway I'll never own a Bonafide Burst. I do have my old fenders that are significantly road worn by me, from gigging, but those days are over. And if I wanted to "Properly age" my historics it will be from my living room or basement chairs playing them with headphones on, and not much sweating going on there. :biggrin:
 
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