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  1. #1
    Les Paul Forum Member
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    The Les Paul as investment

    I'd like to hear your opinion of which of today's Les Paul models -- including historics, customs, and standard lines - would make the most sense in terms of investment value five or ten years in the future. That is, I want to buy a Les Paul today and be able to sell it for significantly more five years from now. Should I get a Standard, a Class 5, an Elegant, or what? Thanks.

  2. #2
    GuitarsfromMars
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Originally posted by Ribald
    I'd like to hear your opinion of which of today's Les Paul models -- including historics, customs, and standard lines - would make the most sense in terms of investment value five or ten years in the future. That is, I want to buy a Les Paul today and be able to sell it for significantly more five years from now. Should I get a Standard, a Class 5, an Elegant, or what? Thanks.
    I think if you were to get yer hands on a 1959 LP Std...you be getting a reasonable return on yer investmentspin

  3. #3
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    I'm talking about current models.

  4. #4
    In the Zone/Backstage Pass
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    What GuitarsFromMars said...Sorry...

  5. #5
    Les Paul Forum Co-Owner Tom Wittrock's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Ribald
    I'm talking about current models.
    Then forget it. Those aren't investments. Any nice Les paul could be worth more in the future, but the track record, and sound reasoning says they won't be good investments, as you describe [selling for a profit].
    The "dividends" these guitars pay, are the usefulness and the enjoyment they give you. And, that has value.
    But, if you want to buy now, and sell higher later, buy vintage.

  6. #6
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    5 years, I don't think so, not on a new one. look at what a 98 goes for now on ebay and you will see. Now you may get lucky and find a deal on a used one that my bring a good return, if you had bought a jimmy page a few years back you could have made some money. I started buying Gibsons a few years ago when my ira rates went to nothing. No tax deduction,but lots more fun. The only time I made good money on an Lp was pure luck. I was in a GC and the scumbags offered this guy 600 for his lefty std. I took him aside and said I'll give you 750 cash. now. or never. He did it. I kept it for a year and got 1100 for it on the bay. That's the most money I ever made on a guitar. But I don't buy them to make money, I do it because ............I'm a guitar JUNKIE. ..yes thats why.

  7. #7
    Bluejazz
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Originally posted by Ribald
    I want to buy a Les Paul today and be able to sell it for significantly more five years from now. Should .
    "significantly more"? That would be the hard part. Don't know if that's possible. But, the current and quickly depleting Historics with Brazilian fingerboards should do okay, depending on a few things. The Gary Rossington model as well, considering that I'm still seeing R9 Murphys at $3000 extra (wtf).

    For "significantly more" investment possibilities you have to go vintage. And that is whole different bag of tricks when it comes to the somewhat more affordable guitars. There's land mines all over the place.

  8. #8
    Wizard of Ozz
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    If you're looking for a good investment look into some Mutual Funds.

    If you're looking for a guitar to play and enjoy, any of the models you first mentioned are excellent choices.

    ;)

  9. #9

    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Originally posted by Ribald
    ...I want to buy a Les Paul today and be able to sell it for significantly more five years from now.
    I'm laughing so hard I'm crying.
    the faster we go the rounder we get

  10. #10
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    The trick seems to be finding something that flops when it comes out, is discontinued, and becomes popular later. The original bursts for example. The Jimmy Page model wasn't a total flop, but I remember reading a few JP fans being disappointed with the model when it before it was discontinued.

  11. #11
    Les Paul Forum Member 58flame's Avatar
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    I am an investment advisor.
    If I (or anyone) knew what was going to be the hot thing tomorrow, I'd be rich.
    Anybody that tells you they know what is going to be the next best thing, is lying. Plain as that. Nobody has a crystal ball.

    You want good investment advice, here it is, absolutely free:

    1. Max out your 401 (k), IRA, or whatever retirement plan you have.
    2. Buy into as much additional tax deferred investments as you can. Variable life insurance, annuities, 529 plans, etc.
    3. Diversify with the proper asset allocation model.
    4. Stick to the investment plan and don't deviate until it is absolutely necessary (a change in risk tolerence is a necessary deviation, for example. a market correction is not, in most cases).

    Trying to guess what will make you the most money is like throwing darts blindfolded.


    Hey fellas have you heard the news, you know that Annie's back in town...

  12. #12
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    Buy a house in Sydney.. near the beach.. if you can afford it.. believe me you'll make a shitload of $$ in 5 years.. assuming you can make the repayments.

    btw..I sold a 93 standard last year (bought new) and made a handsome profit of $50.00

  13. #13
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    58Flame speaks the truth! The more realistic question to ask might be: "Which current model Les Paul can I buy today and not take a bath on it in a few years?" Low production numbers, pristine original condition, great top, and med-light weight will always be good for resale value but appreciation? No absolutes but I'd gamble to say you're better off following 58Flames advice and buy a nice used '99-02 R8 or R9.

  14. #14

    well...

    With some good buys on vintage guitars you MIGHT be able to make significant profits in 5-10 years. You might not.

    58Flame's investment advice is good solid advise, but I think some of it depends on your income and tax brackets.

    I believe that the safest, and surest investment is unimproved land. If you buy in an area reasonably close to a population centre (and don't buy at the top of a price spike) you can hardly lose.
    LAND, They aren't making any more of it, except in the Netherlands.

  15. #15
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    Buy low, Sell high.

    If you want a return on investment, the best way is buying an investment that is undervalued to begin with.

  16. #16
    Les Paul Forum Member Don L's Avatar
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    Unless you buy all original vintage pieces (in good conditions), don't see guitars as investments. You'll have more disappointments than rewards.
    Some things just have to be believed to be seen.

  17. #17
    Bluejazz
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    It was unfortunate when used R7's (a year old) dropped below the price of a new Standard, thereby entering into dime-a-dozen territory.
    That was a slap in the face to a better built guitar, when they'e sold $600 or $700 less than the original purchase price. I just sold my '01 LP Custom for $100 less than what I paid for it, yet still more than what a used R7 goes for. Go figure.

  18. #18
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wittrock View Post
    Then forget it. Those aren't investments. Any nice Les paul could be worth more in the future, but the track record, and sound reasoning says they won't be good investments, as you describe [selling for a profit].
    The "dividends" these guitars pay, are the usefulness and the enjoyment they give you. And, that has value.
    But, if you want to buy now, and sell higher later, buy vintage.
    BACK FROM THE DEAD!

    I googled market future trends on les pauls and this was one of the first google returns.

    it's funny really, I am a very humble independent shop (because just being a musician doesn't cut it), and anything from 1988 to 2010 is my bread and butter. I bet in 2003 the msrp on some of the models brand new was about what they might sell for used now, but there are folks out there ready to spend some coin on something like an early Les Paul Classic from the 90's, nearly twice what they sold for MSRP back then. Especially the plus and premium plus, and especially if it says 'model' instead of 'classic'. It was a nice 1960 reissue more or less, with a short tenon. I bet in 2003 you could pick up a les paul classic premium plus from say 1996 for 750-900..... try 2500 or more today.

    A lot of those guitars hold high regard now, some people call it 'good wood' but whatever you want to call it, the beginning of Henry J's tenure holds value to folks now. Gibson's triumph and rebirth from the Norlin era, and a serious effort to reclaim the brand (but without the pressure and b/s that social media and brand influence hold over it while they are trying to do it once again today....'play authentic' and Mark). You have to recognize a decent product in a lineup with the junk, and be able to qualify the differences. I think they are great investments, because the future will always find a way to cut cost and try to follow inflation.

    Thoughts? I love talking about stuff like this.

  19. #19
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    For me personally, it wouldn't be worth my time to have bought a guitar in 2003 for $1,000 and stored it unplayed in a case for 16 years just to make a $1,500 profit. I've moved house more than ten times since 2003, storage is always at a premium in my houses (I live in a capital city) and a return of under $100 a year for the hassle just isn't worth it to me. I could have invested that $1000 in a friends start up and possibly made a lot more. I was dumb(er) in 2003 though so I didn't invest in anything.

  20. #20
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    I always tell people to buy an instrument to make music and to have FUN , because at the end of the day that's exactly what it's all about !

  21. #21
    Les Paul Forum Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    WTF!WTF!!WTF!!!

    I am so sick and tired of these portfolio dividend commodity investors and their dumb ass speculation threads!!

    What, Gibson is the Franklin Mint?

    Buy some pork bellies or gold coins and quit ruining my musical instruments. Invest in vintage guitars, your ilk has already ruined that. Remember the early 2000's.


    I can buy a great, American made guitar that pays dividends of tone, playability and the pleasure of owning a finely crafted beautiful guitar. If I don't abuse it and take reasonable care, odds are I won't loose my original investment if I sell after a couple decades. Good 'nuf fo me.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  22. #22
    Les Paul Forum Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by RiverCityVintage View Post
    BACK FROM THE DEAD!

    I googled market future trends on les pauls and this was one of the first google returns.

    it's funny really, I am a very humble independent shop (because just being a musician doesn't cut it), and anything from 1988 to 2010 is my bread and butter. I bet in 2003 the msrp on some of the models brand new was about what they might sell for used now, but there are folks out there ready to spend some coin on something like an early Les Paul Classic from the 90's, nearly twice what they sold for MSRP back then. Especially the plus and premium plus, and especially if it says 'model' instead of 'classic'. It was a nice 1960 reissue more or less, with a short tenon. I bet in 2003 you could pick up a les paul classic premium plus from say 1996 for 750-900..... try 2500 or more today.

    A lot of those guitars hold high regard now, some people call it 'good wood' but whatever you want to call it, the beginning of Henry J's tenure holds value to folks now. Gibson's triumph and rebirth from the Norlin era, and a serious effort to reclaim the brand (but without the pressure and b/s that social media and brand influence hold over it while they are trying to do it once again today....'play authentic' and Mark). You have to recognize a decent product in a lineup with the junk, and be able to qualify the differences. I think they are great investments, because the future will always find a way to cut cost and try to follow inflation.

    Thoughts? I love talking about stuff like this.
    Well, your wrong about the price of used Classic plus in 2003. They held value as soon as the MODEL/CLASSIC thing happened. The whole early Classic market history is unique for having been fueled by misinformation and deliberate pumping for profit and having short lived desirable specs that make a small group collectable. Unlike the completely overhyped and very misrepresented Les Paul Faded which was pumped up online by Larry Corsa to pimp his makeover service. Lot's to talk about with these two and hard lessons to learn. Savvy investors don't fall for this but plenty of online readers who don't research facts get taken advantage of and continue the ruse to recoup their investment or protect it.
    Last edited by Big Al; 11-15-19 at 07:32 PM.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  23. #23
    Les Paul Forum Member renderit's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    ALL the LP's I have bought since 2013 have been a marvelous investment!

    I play ALL of them.

    I love to look at ALL of them.

    They bring me more pleasure than any person should have.

    Selling ANY of them would be an incalculable loss!

    Though some day I will HAVE to sell them.

    That day will hold a greater loss than money...


  24. #24

    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    [QUOTE=Big Al;2846401]WTF!WTF!!WTF!!!

    I am so sick and tired of these portfolio dividend commodity investors and their dumb ass speculation threads!!

    What, Gibson is the Franklin Mint?

    Buy some pork bellies or gold coins and quit ruining my musical instruments. Invest in vintage guitars, your ilk has already ruined that. Remember the early 2000's.


    This is the funniest shi* Iíve read in a while. Same thing happened with watches and pedals and lots of other stuff. I think all of it is a bit of a bubble. The over 40 crowd can appreciate this. The under 40 doesnít give a ratís ass about a vintage omega or a klon or a 59 burst. They have apple watches and protools. Iím 48 and those of my generation not only knew the bands the decade before us but decades before us. Same with movies and other arts. These kids nowadays donít know who Chuck Berry is or who Cary Grant is or that The Band was a band. Seriously. Theyíre almost all cultural illiterates hooked on instant gratification and staring at screens all day. Thatís your future market for guitar and watches?!?!

  25. #25
    Les Paul Forum Member thin sissy's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by Ndavis1971 View Post

    This is the funniest shi* Iíve read in a while. Same thing happened with watches and pedals and lots of other stuff. I think all of it is a bit of a bubble. The over 40 crowd can appreciate this. The under 40 doesnít give a ratís ass about a vintage omega or a klon or a 59 burst. They have apple watches and protools. Iím 48 and those of my generation not only knew the bands the decade before us but decades before us. Same with movies and other arts. These kids nowadays donít know who Chuck Berry is or who Cary Grant is or that The Band was a band. Seriously. Theyíre almost all cultural illiterates hooked on instant gratification and staring at screens all day. Thatís your future market for guitar and watches?!?!
    I disagree. I'm a long way from my 40th birthday, and most of my musician friends are in their 20's. I have two 50's LP:s, and they get a LOT of appreciation and admiration from my fellow guitar players. My friends might not be ready to sacrifice as much as I have to buy these expensive guitars, but they DO give a rats ass about them. This reminds me of older generations claiming that young people no longer listen and play guitar based music. It's not true, they do, but you probably don't hang out with them and the media doesn't promote it like they used to .
    This is a song from the new album, it's a deep meaningful song this one... No, it's not whiskey in the fucking jar... Philip Lynott

  26. #26
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by thin sissy View Post
    I disagree. I'm a long way from my 40th birthday, and most of my musician friends are in their 20's. I have two 50's LP:s, and they get a LOT of appreciation and admiration from my fellow guitar players. My friends might not be ready to sacrifice as much as I have to buy these expensive guitars, but they DO give a rats ass about them. This reminds me of older generations claiming that young people no longer listen and play guitar based music. It's not true, they do, but you probably don't hang out with them and the media doesn't promote it like they used to .
    lol! preach

    ''If I had a nickel for every time a boomer complained about a ''millennial'', I could buy a nice house in the market they completely destroyed.''


    I'm turning 33 this month, I learned a lot from and admire my grandfather (APRIL 2019 RIP) who was a navy conflict vet in the pacific (something a boomer wouldn't know a thing about), I own two businesses I started from scratch, NEITHER of which had anything remotely to do with the college education the boomers told me to get that robbed me blind, and I still do not have internet on a smart phone.

    Ive got a 55 gibson, a 60 gibson, a 69 gibson, and a 92 gibson, and play them through a 66 deluxe reverb. I adore them all, and I know how to fix them all, and I gig them regularly. I love a burst, and handled 4 at the philly guitar show a couple weeks ago. All 4 were 59's. I also know how to fix anything in or around my home (that I bought in this busted boomer housing economy), or with my cars, or with my lawn equipment, or anything else for that matter. I grew up on classic rock stations, hate automatic transmissions, love Chuck Berry, could give less of a crap about Cary Grant because Gregory Peck is a better actor, do not own an apple watch, and played a song by The Band today at a gig.

    I also love investing in gibson guitars. I look at everything I spend money on as an opportunity to make a return, whether that's an experience or a dollar. If someone walked up to you today and offered you a thousand bucks would you say no thanks? Why bash the opportunity to make a grand then? I get storage issues, that's cool, but complaining for the sake of it is just childish. It doesn't matter if it is a monumental long term investment, it's how you look at what you spend. I put money in local energy companies and global entertainment companies, ''reinvest those dividends''... I even put some in 420 companies that boomers would have something to say about, but that doesn't make a small investment worthless. The best advice I ever got from my banker was ''some investments are good, and some are better, some are even not worth your time at all. But if I see a dollar on the ground, I am going to pick it up. I don't know anyone who wouldn't.''

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    Well, your wrong about the price of used Classic plus in 2003. They held value as soon as the MODEL/CLASSIC thing happened. The whole early Classic market history is unique for having been fueled by misinformation and deliberate pumping for profit and having short lived desirable specs that make a small group collectable. Unlike the completely overhyped and very misrepresented Les Paul Faded which was pumped up online by Larry Corsa to pimp his makeover service. Lot's to talk about with these two and hard lessons to learn. Savvy investors don't fall for this but plenty of online readers who don't research facts get taken advantage of and continue the ruse to recoup their investment or protect it.
    My first Gibson was a Les Paul Classic premium plus. I bought it in high school for $800 so I could do led zep covers and look cool (was not cool). The pickups were awful. I saved it for 15 years, and sold it for 2799.


    Anyone got anything constructive to add? Or just boomer complaints.

  27. #27
    Les Paul Forum Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Anyone who pimps themselves out as some kind of broker selling new Les Pauls for a quick significant profit is a fraud.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  28. #28
    Les Paul Forum Member marshall1987's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Help me understand all the fawning over early '90s Les Paul Classic w/ "Les Paul Model" on the headstock (pre-Historic)..

    when compared to the slightly later '90s production LP Classic that have "Les Paul Classic" silkscreened on the headstock (Historic era).

    So in the mid-90s Gibson changes one word on the headstock and the collector value decreases significantly?


    FWIW...my friend owned one of the early Les Paul Classics (1991...??) that identified it as a "Les Paul Model". I struggled to play that guitar, what with it's super skinny neck (<0.800"), abnormally high bridge position, 10 lb. weight, green fingerboard inlays, and the awful Gibson 500T ceramic pickups and odd control cavity components.

    The owner of this particular LP Classic went on and on about the Les Paul Model silkscreen as though that made all the difference in the world. I couldn't hand that guitar back to him quickly enough.
    "Scan not a friend under a microscopic glass; you know his faults so let his foibles pass".

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  29. #29
    Les Paul Forum Member Billy Porter's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    .
    Last edited by Billy Porter; 11-17-19 at 08:24 AM.
    Youíre never alone with a schizophrenic

  30. #30
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    Anyone who pimps themselves out as some kind of broker selling new Les Pauls for a quick significant profit is a fraud.
    super useful, thanks for sharing. what do you do for a living?


    Quote Originally Posted by marshall1987 View Post
    Help me understand all the fawning over early '90s Les Paul Classic w/ "Les Paul Model" on the headstock (pre-Historic)..

    when compared to the slightly later '90s production LP Classic that have "Les Paul Classic" silkscreened on the headstock (Historic era).

    So in the mid-90s Gibson changes one word on the headstock and the collector value decreases significantly?


    FWIW...my friend owned one of the early Les Paul Classics (1991...??) that identified it as a "Les Paul Model". I struggled to play that guitar, what with it's super skinny neck (<0.800"), abnormally high bridge position, 10 lb. weight, green fingerboard inlays, and the awful Gibson 500T ceramic pickups and odd control cavity components.

    The owner of this particular LP Classic went on and on about the Les Paul Model silkscreen as though that made all the difference in the world. I couldn't hand that guitar back to him quickly enough.
    It didn't really mean a huge deal, but some folks really liked them because they were another first for Gibson, and that is special sometimes. No more 3 and 4 piece tops, no more 2 and 3 and 4 piece bodies. No more 3 piece necks. Just like how the new stuff might excite people now. The first classics had thin binding in the cutaway like an original, had model on the headstock instead of classic (the original story was that dealers confused them between custom shop models and production reissues because the quality was nearly the same, especially in the tops, and there were no distinguishing features to denote a difference between them). That meant a big deal since they hadn't done that on a production model except for the 59 reissue and limited models throughout the 80's, and that their change from 'model' to 'classic' coincided with the introduction of the custom shop, and it was just a very nice production era for Gibson and their QC in general. Very nice stuff.

    The only bummer was the snot green inlays, and the ceramic pups. Otherwise, beautiful guitars.

  31. #31
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by marshall1987 View Post
    Help me understand all the fawning over early '90s Les Paul Classic w/ "Les Paul Model" on the headstock (pre-Historic)..

    when compared to the slightly later '90s production LP Classic that have "Les Paul Classic" silkscreened on the headstock (Historic era).

    So in the mid-90s Gibson changes one word on the headstock and the collector value decreases significantly?


    FWIW...my friend owned one of the early Les Paul Classics (1991...??) that identified it as a "Les Paul Model". I struggled to play that guitar, what with it's super skinny neck (<0.800"), abnormally high bridge position, 10 lb. weight, green fingerboard inlays, and the awful Gibson 500T ceramic pickups and odd control cavity components.

    The owner of this particular LP Classic went on and on about the Les Paul Model silkscreen as though that made all the difference in the world. I couldn't hand that guitar back to him quickly enough.
    it's also important to know that no Classic is a Prehistoric. Prehistoric's are pre-custom shop reissues, from 83 to 93, mostly 59 flametops, and sometimes goldtop 57's, and the occasional black custom (though I am pretty sure those were production customs and folks just want to make things up and use the wrong words to advert). There were never '60 reissue Prehistorics, and never ever were they Classics. A Classic was just a 1960 tribute of sorts.

  32. #32
    Les Paul Forum Member marshall1987's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by RiverCityVintage View Post
    it's also important to know that no Classic is a Prehistoric. Prehistoric's are pre-custom shop reissues, from 83 to 93, mostly 59 flametops, and sometimes goldtop 57's, and the occasional black custom (though I am pretty sure those were production customs and folks just want to make things up and use the wrong words to advert). There were never '60 reissue Prehistorics, and never ever were they Classics. A Classic was just a 1960 tribute of sorts.
    Thanks for the history lesson; however with respect to the Les Paul Classic guitars, I used the term "prehistoric" in the context of those instruments that were marketed and sold in the early '90s before the launch of the Historic Reissue models. I didn't suggest that the early Les Paul Classics were "prehistoric" reissue models like those from 1983 onward.
    "Scan not a friend under a microscopic glass; you know his faults so let his foibles pass".

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  33. #33

    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by RiverCityVintage View Post
    lol! preach

    ''If I had a nickel for every time a boomer complained about a ''millennial'', I could buy a nice house in the market they completely destroyed.''


    I'm turning 33 this month, I learned a lot from and admire my grandfather (APRIL 2019 RIP) who was a navy conflict vet in the pacific (something a boomer wouldn't know a thing about), I own two businesses I started from scratch, NEITHER of which had anything remotely to do with the college education the boomers told me to get that robbed me blind, and I still do not have internet on a smart phone.

    Ive got a 55 gibson, a 60 gibson, a 69 gibson, and a 92 gibson, and play them through a 66 deluxe reverb. I adore them all, and I know how to fix them all, and I gig them regularly. I love a burst, and handled 4 at the philly guitar show a couple weeks ago. All 4 were 59's. I also know how to fix anything in or around my home (that I bought in this busted boomer housing economy), or with my cars, or with my lawn equipment, or anything else for that matter. I grew up on classic rock stations, hate automatic transmissions, love Chuck Berry, could give less of a crap about Cary Grant because Gregory Peck is a better actor, do not own an apple watch, and played a song by The Band today at a gig.

    I also love investing in gibson guitars. I look at everything I spend money on as an opportunity to make a return, whether that's an experience or a dollar. If someone walked up to you today and offered you a thousand bucks would you say no thanks? Why bash the opportunity to make a grand then? I get storage issues, that's cool, but complaining for the sake of it is just childish. It doesn't matter if it is a monumental long term investment, it's how you look at what you spend. I put money in local energy companies and global entertainment companies, ''reinvest those dividends''... I even put some in 420 companies that boomers would have something to say about, but that doesn't make a small investment worthless. The best advice I ever got from my banker was ''some investments are good, and some are better, some are even not worth your time at all. But if I see a dollar on the ground, I am going to pick it up. I don't know anyone who wouldn't.''



    My first Gibson was a Les Paul Classic premium plus. I bought it in high school for $800 so I could do led zep covers and look cool (was not cool). The pickups were awful. I saved it for 15 years, and sold it for 2799.


    Anyone got anything constructive to add? Or just boomer complaints.

    ding ding ding. We have two millennials on here who apparently canít add. I am not a boomer. Iím Gen X. The math ainít hard. I donít know what it is about you guys throwing the ďboomerĒ around indiscriminately. And I said most of you millennials. Not all. Thatíd be an idiotic statement. Time will tell but Iím pretty confident on my prediction that your generation and subsequent ones arenít gonna be into vintage guitars and watches as an investment and forking about money to buy them. Youíll find out. The hard way unfortunately. But enjoy them. As long as youíre not planning on selling one day and reaping a bunch of money.

  34. #34
    Les Paul Forum Member
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by renderit View Post
    ALL the LP's I have bought since 2013 have been a marvelous investment!

    I play ALL of them.

    I love to look at ALL of them.

    They bring me more pleasure than any person should have.

    Selling ANY of them would be an incalculable loss!

    Though some day I will HAVE to sell them.

    That day will hold a greater loss than money...
    Such true words and sentiment and agree 100 %

  35. #35
    Les Paul Forum Member AA00475Bassman's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Pay day & huge dividends are collected every time I play one of my many Historic's & they are great to look at !
    Ive never confused owning a bunch of high end gear with being some kind of a guitar player I'm a hack and I love guitars !

    He thinks the mirror is a photo of a clown ?

    The Myth: Neat wiring layouts always equate to great-sounding amps.

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    Think about it
    won't you ...... Please !

  36. #36
    Les Paul Forum Member deytookerjaabs's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by Ndavis1971 View Post
    ding ding ding. We have two millennials on here who apparently can’t add. I am not a boomer. I’m Gen X. The math ain’t hard. I don’t know what it is about you guys throwing the “boomer” around indiscriminately. And I said most of you millennials. Not all. That’d be an idiotic statement. Time will tell but I’m pretty confident on my prediction that your generation and subsequent ones aren’t gonna be into vintage guitars and watches as an investment and forking about money to buy them. You’ll find out. The hard way unfortunately. But enjoy them. As long as you’re not planning on selling one day and reaping a bunch of money.


    Math?


    Hmmm.


    I'd argue the opposite with my luddite math skills. There's roughly at least 18 Million+ Millionaires in the United States alone. Of course, about half these more or less likely with that much disposable income. A smaller fraction with disposable income most couldn't comprehend. But, vintage guitars are a global thing. So, add in the millionaires from England, Japan, China, etc.

    Now, how many vintage guitars are out there? 5,000 or so black guard Teles, a lot less 'bursts, then you get into smaller numbers of old Martins, then work your way just every damn 50's Les Paul & Strat & Tele & Gretsch.

    I think if you knew the answers here you'd find that the portion of folks with massive disposable income needed to prop up the vintage market is actually incredibly tiny. This means, the generation at large need not be interested in vintage guitars, not even close. My neighbors are in their 30's and they buy really expensive overpriced crappy "mid century furniture" for their house. They brag about what they paid for an ugly dresser, I roll my eyes and they'd think me nuts to buy a vintage guitar all the same.

    So, as long as a tiny minority are into vintage guitars and that minority is not simply satisfied with 5 or 10 of them but often times needs to fill a warehouse then you can rest assured the market is going nowhere sans an all encompassing economic catastrophe. That's the basic math: not a lot of vintage guitars, tons, millions, of people who can afford damn near all of them.



    Now, me, I've definitely been the benefactor of selling guitars years later for much more than my buying price thanks to the market. But, I don't brag about it because it's not a personal accomplishment which should imbue pride in anyone. It's just taking advantage of market forces larger than myself, all I did was keep the guitar around for a while, lol. I could brag about my "investment bravado" but I'll leave that to others. Sure, if I didn't just buy what I like I'd probably do decent at flipping them too. I'm just not into the whole "picking money up off the ground" mentality. If you are, good for you.

  37. #37
    Les Paul Forum Member thin sissy's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by Ndavis1971 View Post
    ding ding ding. We have two millennials on here who apparently canít add. I am not a boomer. Iím Gen X. The math ainít hard. I donít know what it is about you guys throwing the ďboomerĒ around indiscriminately. And I said most of you millennials. Not all. Thatíd be an idiotic statement. Time will tell but Iím pretty confident on my prediction that your generation and subsequent ones arenít gonna be into vintage guitars and watches as an investment and forking about money to buy them. Youíll find out. The hard way unfortunately. But enjoy them. As long as youíre not planning on selling one day and reaping a bunch of money.
    Can you read? I never called you a boomer, I don't base my opinion of others on their age, you seem very hung up on it. You didn't write "most of you millenials", I've quoted what you wrote below. Like I tried to point out, my first hand experience doesn't confirm your opinion, but believe what you will

    IF vintage guitars become worthless in the future (I personally doubt it, because of the reasons deytookerjaabs wrote), then I'll gladly be the one buying them dirt cheap This is because I love them as instruments and don't plan on selling them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ndavis1971 View Post
    This is the funniest shi* Iíve read in a while. Same thing happened with watches and pedals and lots of other stuff. I think all of it is a bit of a bubble. The over 40 crowd can appreciate this. The under 40 doesnít give a ratís ass about a vintage omega or a klon or a 59 burst. They have apple watches and protools. Iím 48 and those of my generation not only knew the bands the decade before us but decades before us. Same with movies and other arts. These kids nowadays donít know who Chuck Berry is or who Cary Grant is or that The Band was a band. Seriously. Theyíre almost all cultural illiterates hooked on instant gratification and staring at screens all day. Thatís your future market for guitar and watches?!?!
    This is a song from the new album, it's a deep meaningful song this one... No, it's not whiskey in the fucking jar... Philip Lynott

  38. #38

    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by Ribald View Post
    I'd like to hear your opinion of which of today's Les Paul models -- including historics, customs, and standard lines - would make the most sense in terms of investment value five or ten years in the future. That is, I want to buy a Les Paul today and be able to sell it for significantly more five years from now. Should I get a Standard, a Class 5, an Elegant, or what? Thanks.

    If you collect guitars you will usually buy at retail and sell closer to wholesale. It depends on how much time you are willing to spend marketing to get the best price.
    There may be a few current models that will be worth more in the future but the hope for that is not an advisable investment strategy.
    '68 Gibson ES-330
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  39. #39

    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by thin sissy View Post
    Can you read? I never called you a boomer, I don't base my opinion of others on their age, you seem very hung up on it. You didn't write "most of you millenials", I've quoted what you wrote below. Like I tried to point out, my first hand experience doesn't confirm your opinion, but believe what you will

    IF vintage guitars become worthless in the future (I personally doubt it, because of the reasons deytookerjaabs wrote), then I'll gladly be the one buying them dirt cheap This is because I love them as instruments and don't plan on selling them.
    yeah you’re right. It was that other guy. I had someone in another forum accuse me of being a boomer. It’s like some comeback now for criticizing someone older. Anyhow sorry about that. I got confused. It’s like some new millennial put down that keeps getting repeated. Anyhow, of course it’s a generalization. There are always exceptions. I just don’t see a market 20-30 years down the road for this stuff like there is today. It seems protools and modeling amps and all that crap is becoming the new thing. Even for guys in my age group. If there a market, I think it’ll be for museum quality stuff and for the Paul Allen types who collect very specific items. That’s my prediction. I think the bubble already has burst a bit. Vintage prices have gone down a bit.

  40. #40
    Les Paul Forum Co-Owner Tom Wittrock's Avatar
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    Re: The Les Paul as investment

    Quote Originally Posted by TSilleck View Post
    If you collect guitars you will usually buy at retail and sell closer to wholesale. It depends on how much time you are willing to spend marketing to get the best price.
    There may be a few current models that will be worth more in the future but the hope for that is not an advisable investment strategy.
    Your response is 16 & 1/2 years after the question. Do you think he will see your answer?
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